English Exceptions to Becoming a U.S. citizen

English Exceptions to Becoming a U.S. Citizen 

Normally for a permanent resident to become a U.S. citizen, the permanent resident has to show basic understanding, speaking, writing and reading English. These English requirements stop many permanent residents from becoming U.S. citizens. 

There are three exceptions to the English language citizenship requirements:

a) Be 50 years or older and be a permanent resident for more than 20 years
(still have to take civics test in native language);

b) Be 55 years or older and be a permanent resident for more than 15 years
(still have to take civics test in native language); or

c) Have a physical or developmental disability or mental impairment that impairs one from learning English
(DO NOT have to take civics test).

It is one thing to have a disability or an impairment. It is another thing to prove the disability or impairment to USCIS (immigration). USCIS thinks all immigrants and their attorneys are liars and tries not to approve such medical exception cases.

Thus, to prove a physical disability, a developmental disability or a mental impairment, requires careful evaluating, planning and coordinating. I have successfully helped clients who spoke little or no English become US citizens based upon their disability/impairment.

Please contact me to evaluate, plan and coordinate your case… and your life.